Friday, November 06, 2009

And You Thought Warehouse Stores Just Looked Depressing

I get depressed at the thought of my food options anytime I take a road trip. Turns out this trepidation is more clinical than I thought. In a new study out of England, researchers at University College London have discovered that people with a diet high in processed foods have a 58% higher risk of depression.

Processed food link to depression: research

The perils of road food in the USA are a thing of lore; satirized in films and literature almost anywhere you look.

Obama Drastically Scales Back Goals For America After Visiting Denny's
But if you’ve ever wandered in to a big box food chain you know that we have more to fear than AM/PM markets. At least 90% of the food options are these stores falls into the convenience category, basically because only things with preservatives fit the big box model of doing business. This is probably why most of these chains now also have a drug counter, so you can fill your prescription for the Zoloft you’re going to need because of the food you’re buying.


Anonymous said...

What's most depressing about The Onion is that their satire is hardly a stretch from what is reported daily from the "news" outlets.

I'm not sure I'd take any study from UC London on fast food very seriously. I mean, they don't have In 'n Outs in England; and I rarely feel depressed after a double-double. Hell, I often feel like I can conquer the world, because I can.


Steve Edwards said...

In and Out may be fast food but it's not convenient because they make it after you order it. From scratch. I think they're still rated as one of the few fast food chains that uses real food in their ingredients.

Steve Edwards said...

I get more spam than comments on this blog, mainly in languages other than english. Anyone know what language this is? Makes me feel like drinking Ouzo for some reason.

Налоговики - миллионеры... БУСАРЕВ ВЯЧЕСЛАВ ВАЛЕНТ... Налоговики - миллионеры...

Donnie Karabatsos said...

Those are good burgers, Walter.